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NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY LETTERS
including Psychoneuroimmunology, Neuro
psychopharmacology,
Reproductive Medicine, Chronobiology
and Human Ethology
ISSN 0172–780X


CONTENTS SPECIAL ISSUE
HUMAN ETHOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY
Vol. 23, December 2002

Human Mate Guarding

Human Mate Guarding         [REFERENCES]

David M. Buss
University of Texas, Austin, USA.

Submitted: September 4, 2002
Accepted: September 6, 2002

Key words:
mating, jealousy, conflict, mate guarding

REVIEW ARTICLE
2002; 23(suppl 4) :2329
pii: NEL231002R02
PMID: 12496732

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ABSTRACT

Long-term committed mating is a fundamental strategy in the human repertoire. Successful enactment of this strategy requires solving two related adaptive problems – fending off potential mate poachers and preventing a mates from defecting. Mate guarding adaptations evolved to solve these persistent problems. Those who failed in mate guarding risked suffering substantial reproductive costs ranging from genetic cuckoldry to reputational damage to the entire loss of a mate. Because the precise nature of the adaptive problems confronted differed historically for the sexes, men and women evolved corresponding differences in the underlying psychology of mate guarding. Men’s mate guarding, relative to that of women’s, is strongly triggered as a consequence of being mated to young and physically attractive women, being confronted by interested rivals who have superior economic resources or prospects, and having a mate who displays signs of sexual involvement with a rival. Women’s mate guarding, relative to that of men’s, is triggered as a consequence of being mated to men high in income and status striving, rivals who are more physically attractive, and having a partner who shows signs of emotional involvement with another woman. Behavioral output of mate guarding adaptations range from vigilance to violence.      

 

REFERENCES

1 Buss DM. The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating (Revised Edition). New York: Basic Books; 2003.

2 Buss DM. Conflict between the sexes: Strategic interference and the evocation of anger and upset. J Pers Soc Psychol, 1989; 56:735–747.

3 Buss DM. From vigilance to violence: Tactics of mate retention. Ethology and Sociobiology 1988; 9:291–317.

4 Thornhill R, Alcock J. The evolution of insect mating systems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; 1983.

5 Thornhill R, Alcock J. The evolution of insect mating systems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; 1983.

6 Alexander RD. Evolutionary change in cricket acoustical communication. Evolution 1962; 16:443–467.

7 Thornhill R, Alcock J. The evolution of insect mating systems. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press; 1983.

8 Buss DM. The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating (Revised Edition). New York: Basic Books; 2003.

9 Schmitt DP, Buss DM. Human mate poaching: Tactics and temptations for infiltrating existing relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2001; 80:894–917.

10 Schmitt DP. Desire for sexual variety and mate poaching experiences across multiple languages and cultures. Paper presented to the Annual Meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society, London, June, 2001.

11 Daly M, Wilson M, Weghorst SJ. Male sexual jealousy. Ethology and Sociobiology 1982; 3:11–27.

12 Symons D. The evolution of human sexuality. New York: Oxford University Press; 1979.

13 Buss DM, Larsen R, Westen D, Semmelroth J. Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science 1992; 3:251–255.

14 Daly M, Wilson M, Weghorst SJ Male sexual jealousy. Ethology and Sociobiology 1982; 3:11–27.

15 Buss DM. The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy is as Necessary as Love and Sex. New York: Free Press; 2000.

16 Buss DM, Larsen R, Westen D, Semmelroth J. Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science 1992; 3:251–255.

17 Buss DM. The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating (Revised Edition). New York: Basic Books; 2003.

18 DeSteno DA, Salovey P. Evolutionary origins of sex differences in jealousy: Questioning the “fitness” of the model. Psychological Science 1996; 7:367–372.

19 Buss DM, Shackelford TK, Kirkpatrick, LA, Choe J, Hasegawa M, Hasegawa T, Bennett K. Jealousy and the Nature of Beliefs About Infidelity: Tests of Competing Hypotheses About Sex Differences in the United States, Korea, and Japan. Personal Relationships; 1999; 6:125–150.

20 Pietrzak R, Laird JD, Stevens, DA, Thompson NS. Sex differences in human jealousy: A coordinated study of forced-choice, continuous rating-scale, and physiological responses on the same subjects. Evolution and Human Behavior 2002; 23:83–94.

21 Shackelford TK, Buss DM, Bennett K. Forgiveness or breakup: Sex differences in responses to a partner’s infidelity. Cognition and Emotion 2002; 16:299–307.

22 Betzig L. Causes of conjugal dissolution. Current Anthropology 1989; 30:654–676.

23 Buss DM, Shackelford TK, Choe J, Buunk B, Dijkstra P. Distress about rivals: Reactions to intrasexual competitors in Korea, the Netherlands, and America. Personal Relationships 2000; 7:235–243.

24 Buss DM. Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses testing in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1989; 12:1–49.

25 Buss DM. The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating (Revised Edition). New York: Basic Books; 2003.

26 Kenrick DT, Keefe RC. Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1992; 15:75–133.

27 Haselton MG, Buss DM. Error Management Theory: A new perspective on biases in cross-sex mind reading. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 2000; 78: 81–91.

28 Haselton MG. The sexual overperception bias: Evidence of a systematic bias in men from a survey of naturally occurring events. Journal of Research in Personality in press.

29 Haselton MG, Buss DM. Biases in Social Judgment: Design Flaws or Design Features? In: Forgas J, von Hippel W, Williams K, editors. Responding to the Social World: Explicit and Implicit Processes in Social Judgments and Decisions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press; in press.

30 Buss DM. The Evolution of Desire: Strategies of Human Mating (Revised Edition). New York: Basic Books; 2003.

31 Paul L, Foss MA, Galloway J. Sexual jealousy in young women and men: Aggressive responsiveness to partner and rival. Aggressive Behavior 1993; 19:401–420.

32 Buss DM. The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy is as Necessary as Love and Sex. New York: Free Press; 2000.

33 Buss DM. The Dangerous Passion: Why Jealousy is as Necessary as Love and Sex. New York: Free Press; 2000.

34 Buss DM. From vigilance to violence: Tactics of mate retention. Ethology and Sociobiology 1988; 9:291–317.

35 Buss DM. From vigilance to violence: Tactics of mate retention. Ethology and Sociobiology 1988; 9:291–317.

36 Buss DM, Shackelford TK. From vigilance to violence: Mate retention tactics in married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 1997; 72:346–361.

37 Buss DM, Shackelford TK. From vigilance to violence: Mate retention tactics in married couples. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 1997; 72:346–361.

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NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY LETTERS
including Psychoneuroimmunology, Neuro
psychopharmacology,
Reproductive Medicine, Chronobiology
and Human Ethology
ISSN 0172–780X


A peer-reviewed transdisciplinary Journal covering Neuroendocrinology, Psychoneuroimmunology, Neuropsychopharmacology, Reproductive Medicine, Chronobiology and Human Ethology for RAPID publication of Original Papers, Review Articles, State-of-the-Art, Clinical Reports, Meta-Analyses and other contributions from all the fields covered by Neuroendocrinology Letters. E-mail: info@nel.edu

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