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NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY LETTERS
including Psychoneuroimmunology, Neuropsychopharmacology,
Reproductive Medicine, Chronobiology
and Human Ethology, ISSN 0172–780X

NEL Vol.24 Nos.3/4, Jun-Aug 2003

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

The effects of music and visual stress on testosterone and cortisol in men and women

2003; 24:173180
pii: NEL243403A04
PMID: 14523353

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Related articles: M. Hassler "Music medicine. A neurobiological approach"


The effects of music and visual stress on testosterone and cortisol in men and women

Hajime Fukui & Masako Yamashita

Nara University of Education, Nara University of Education, Department of Education, Takabatake, Nara City, Nara, JAPAN.

Submitted: March 25, 2003
Accepted: April 29, 2003

Key words:
testosterone, cortisol, listening to music, visual stress, differences between the sexes

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to examine sex-related differences in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) changes with music listening and visual stress.

SETTING AND DESIGN: Saliva T and C concentrations were measured in 88 healthy college students (44 males and 44 females). These subjects were placed in one of 4 different conditions: (1) 30 min of listening to music, (2) 30 min of listening to music with visual stress (documentary film without sound including violent scenes), (3) 30 min of visual stress without music, and (4) 30 min of silence.

METHODS: All subjects provided two saliva samples, one collected before intervention and the other after intervention. T and C levels were assessed by radio immuno assay (RIA).
RESULTS: There was a significant difference between the sexes in the way music affected T. Music decreased T in males, whereas it increased T in females. As for C, no sex-related differences were found under any of the conditions studied. C decreased with music and increased under other conditions.

THE MAIN FINDINGS: Our data suggests that the effects of music and stress on T differ between males and females.

CONCLUSION: Further investigation is necessary to evaluate the relationships between music and other substances, the effect of degree of preference and
hormonal changes not only during music listening but also during music plays and creation.

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